Shade Tree Commission

The Shade Tree Commission helped update the Shade Tree Ordinances; reviews subdivision and land development applications and recommends where to save trees as well as type, quantity and location of replaement trees; maintains heritage tree inventory.

The Shade Tree Commission meets on an as-needed basis.  Meetings are open to the public. Three members appointed by the Board of Commissioners serve on the Commission for three-year terms without compensation.  The Commission also has several ad hoc members.

Please click here to see the list of Recommended Tree List as well as the Excluded Invasive Trees:

Shade Tree Commission Members Term Expiring
Lisa Jacobs (Chair) 31-Dec-19
Carrie Miluski 31-Dec-22
Connor Diggins 31-Dec-22
Joy Clauss (ad-hoc) 31-Dec-22

The Shade Tree Commission is currently seeking passionate individuals to serve as ad-hoc members. Anyone interested is encouraged to apply. Please send an email to Gary Cummings (gcummings@netherprovidence.org) if you are interested.

Emerald Ash Borer Information:

What is the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)?

The emerald ash borer, or Agrilus planipennis, is an Asian insect that kills ash trees (trees in the genus Fraxinus) by boring bark tunnels under the bark.  The first insects arrived in Michigan in 2002, in the years since has devastated ash trees across the United States.  The emerald ash borer arrived in western Pennsylvania in 2012.  In 2018, ash trees in Nether Providence showed the first signs of attack.

How will it affect my trees?

Emerald ash borers kill ash trees.

In the spring, adult emerald ash borers emerge from infected trees, mate, and eat the edges of ash leaves for about two weeks before the females lay their eggs.  When the eggs hatch, the larva burrow into the bark of the ash trees and begin to eat the inner layers of the bark.  As they grow and eat, the larva cut off the flow of water and nutrients to the leaves, killing the tree within two years.

What can I do about it?

Treat or remove ash trees on your property.

Contact a licensed, certified arborist or tree care company.  Trees may be treated with a range of insecticides to prevent emerald ash borer infestation.  Two of the most common treatments are in-bark injections and in-ground injections.  Used properly, these offer an 85-95% chance of saving the tree.

Trees may also be removed and replaced with a appropriate species other than ash.  (For types of tree recommended by Nether Providence Township, see http://netherprovidence.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Recommended-Plantings-and-Invasive-List.pdf).

Dead or dying trees are dangerously brittle and should be removed immediately, because they will begin drop large limbs.

Do I have an ash tree in my yard?

If you think you have an ash tree in your yard, visit https://ento.psu.edu/extension/trees-shrubs/emerald-ash-borer/factsheets/EAB2942.pdf for the Penn State Extension service guide to identifying ash tree, or contact the Shade Tree Commission at the Nether Providence Township Office (610-566-4516).

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Tree Planting –

On November 18, the Shade Tree Commission (STC) together with Nether Providence Township Employees and Boy Scout Pack 145, planted a total of eight trees at Summit School, Sapovits Park, Wilson Park, and Bullens Lane Park.  The new trees included two service berries, two red maples, two sugar maples, one red oak, and one American elm.

The trees were purchased as part of the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society’s Plant a Million Program.  The PHS sells bare root saplings to organizations in thirteen counties surrounding Philadelphia with the goal of planting one million trees and increasing our tree cover.  Our Township has participated in this program for several years and has planted a several dozen trees throughout Nether Providence.  As in years past, our excellent Public Works Department will water and care for the new trees as they establish themselves over the next year.  We hope you will stop by and welcome our new neighborhood trees.